The Calligrapher's Life

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Calligraphers Must Be the Best Recyclers


According to the EPA, Americans use over 85 million tons of paper products per year and we’re only recycling half that much annually. If you know anyone involved in the arts, it’s no doubt they’re using their fair share of paper for sketching, writing, or painting. In my opinion, they should be avid recyclers.

With the amount of paper calligraphers use for practice, we should be number one at recycling. Sketch artists and painters usually sketch lightly on a page, but normally keep it for the final project. On the other hand, calligraphers hone their skill by practicing several hours in an effort to maintain mastery of a lettering style; otherwise, they’ll lose the ability to create flawless lettering. When you think about it…that takes up a lot of paper!

During the school year, I compared my paper use with my children and wondered who uses more paper…them or me? While they’re using paper for homework, tests, art projects and plain old doodling, it’s not uncommon for me to use practice paper and sketch pads every week to perfect a certain letter styles or plan out an art project. While sitting at my art desk, I’ll pull sheet after sheet practicing and sketching layouts consuming more paper than I realize. It’s fun, but the paper’s piling up.

In an effort to save on costs and unnecessary paper consumption, I’ve tried writing on both sides of the paper. If you haven’t tried this before-take my advice-it’s not a good idea. Unfortunately, writing on the back poses problems depending on the prior ink used. When the ink dries, indents and bumps from lettering on the other side causes the nib to skip or rip up the paper. At best, it’s aggravating.

So, if I’m strictly using the paper for practicing styles, I’ll cover every inch of blank space with lettering, excluding the normal area for ascenders and descenders. As stacks pile up each week, I find this practice reduces excess paper use, though it’s still necessary to make room for new paper.

Over the years, I’ve managed to develop a large collection of practice sheets, so it’s time to organize and recycle them. Looking back, it’s not easy to let go of the hard work I put into those pages. It impresses me to see how much I’ve accomplished in my ability to create polished calligraphy letters, but now I’m prepared to let go.

As a compromise, I’ll keep the first two practice sheets from a new letter style, plus any doodling sheets for future inspiration. Everything else gets recycled. I promise.

Do you save your practice sheets or recycle them?

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