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Archive for the tag “brush lettering”

What about Chinese Calligraphy?

Chinese calligraphy certainly isn’t like the American and European handwriting I’ve come to respect over the decades. But, as an artist, I’m in awe of every stroke it takes to create Chinese characters.

Throughout the years, I’ve admired the dark, heavy strokes twisted and altered into intriguing designs on tattoos, tapestries, rubber stamps, paintings, and clothing without any notion what the characters meant.  Before my passion for calligraphic arts grew, I think I’ve been exposed to countless examples of Chinese calligraphy without realizing its form and beauty.

Now that’s it’s caught some serious attention from me-I wonder-am I ready for such a challenging art? Well, I guess anything’s possible.

Like American and European calligraphy, Chinese handwriting was originally designed to create uniformity across China for all personal and business communications.

In fact, Chinese calligraphy originated around the 2nd to 4th centuries and then it was memorialized in theoretical books to transfer the handwriting to later generations. Eventually, this writing gained popularity with additional countries across the Orient, such as Korea, Japan and Singapore, for art pieces and paintings, which developed a strong American appreciation over decades.

Within the past year, I’ve practiced calligraphy styles like italics, uncial, Copperplate, and Spencerian, but Chinese calligraphy piqued my interest over the summer. So, I checked into it and discovered some great ways to start. In my research, I found several video demos and online courses to aide in transferring my current calligraphy skill into practicing beautiful Chinese handwriting.

While checking for “how-to” videos, I stumbled across a couple of Chinese calligraphy video demonstrations and I watched in awe as the artists transformed each piece into a fabulous work of art, no matter what tool they were using. Immediately, I wondered how long it would take a novice (like me) to learn.

In one video, the artist used a simple brush on paper. In the second video, a calligrapher dipped a mop into a large bucket of ink drawing heavy dark strokes on a large piece of paper stretched across the floor.

Both Chinese artists created steady, yet focused strokes and lines while earning my full respect.

Shortly after the demonstrations, I was humbled. As much as I enjoy a good calligraphy challenge, I quickly changed my mind about practicing this fine art solo at this stage in my calligraphy skill. But, I do plan to give it a try in the future.

For now, I suggest seasoned calligraphers or extremely daring novices try their skill with this interesting art for a new project or challenge.

If you want to learn Chinese calligraphy, take full advantage of the resources on the web. To find out more visit this site for additional links to online courses.

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Give Brush Lettering A Try

paintbrush

If you’ve never tried brush lettering, it’s actually easier than you think.

Artisans accustomed to using a paint brush might have an easier time with it, but don’t let it chase you away if you’ve never picked up a paint brush before.

Brush lettering is a form of calligraphy used by artists and writers from all over the world for communicating visual arts. It’s simply creating letters or characters with a small paint brush and acrylic or oil paints.

Although this freehand lettering remained popular for sign writing and other paraphernalia in early American history, it’s lost prominence due to the rise in computer technology. Fortunately, artists and calligraphers keep it alive through arts and crafts projects across the country.

For instance, I recently used a casual style brush lettering for hand-crafted invitations with impressive results. Even without prior professional instruction, I received several compliments, which boosted my confidence and inspired me to learn more.

The Calligrapher’s Bible by David Harris and Brush Lettering Step-By Step by Jim Gray and Bobbie Gray were two good sources of instruction. The former provides simple tips on creating modern brush lettering in a variety of styles and the latter demonstrates brush lettering basics for artists or beginners who need guidance through each step. It also provides ways to practice with minimal investment by using tools and supplies you might already have.

If you’re a calligrapher who prefers writing with pen and ink, grasping the concept of this lettering only takes patience and enthusiasm. And, it should be a breeze to learn solo along with a lettering guide since it requires similar strokes with a slightly different approach.

So, give it try and practice until you’re comfortable and pleased with your progress. When you’re ready, move onto adding charm to your favorite item with a name or quote on glass, wood or canvas.

The audacious calligraphers who’ve practiced brush lettering understand the balance of joy and challenges that accompany this art form. From monograms to quotes, brush lettering gives artists infinite fun and creative possibilities as soon as they pick up a paint brush.

Have you tried brush lettering? What projects have you worked on?

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